To do so, we used five of the state’s largest electricity companies to explore six things you'll have to evaluate when you're comparing plans and providers: We’ll walk you through customer satisfaction scores, running the numbers on rates, and calculating the impact of different fees, discounts, and contract types. We'll weigh in on extra perks, like points, and green energy too.

When it comes to the electricity itself, there is no difference at all. A cheap electric supply is the same electricity, it's simply provided by a new supplier (unless you opt for green energy - more on that here). As suppliers buy and generate different sets of energy they also have different prices. What's more, you might be on a tariff that is simply more expensive, such as a standard tariff. If you decide to switch electricity don't equate a lower price with worse service.
That means that customers in Houston paid an average of $5,500 more for electricity over a 14-year time span beginning in 2002, according to the group that buys electricity on behalf of municipal governments in Texas. The calculation, which uses data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, assumes monthly electricity use of 1,300 kilowatt hours.
Maryland is among 15 states where electricity customers may choose their providers. It's called deregulation, but it might be less confusing to call it energy choice. Customers may select their electricity supplier - providers compete on price, term length, percentage of renewable energy and more. Electricity will continue to be delivered by a utility.
But competition didn't necessarily end up cutting prices, according to the report. One contributing factor is confusion among customers as they try to choose among scores of retail electricity providers and the overwhelming variation of plans, leading many to just stick with familiar companies rather than look for better deals, according to the Texas Coalition for Affordable Power .

Twenty-nine states have deregulated electricity, natural gas or both. That allows you to shop for the supply portion of your bill from alternative providers who may offer rates lower than the default supplier – usually a utility. Delivery services and billing will remain the responsibility of the local utility as they own the power lines and wires that keep the lights on.
Founded in 2005, Infinite Energy offers great rates and award-winning, U.S.-based customer care, and serving most of New Jersey. They offer contracts anywhere from one month to up to five years. Infinite Energy offers flexible payment plans, managing accounts through online portal, customizing plans and services, and paying bills online. Infinite Energy also offers paperless billing and autopay options.

XOOM Energy, LLC through its family of companies is an independent retail electricity, renewable and natural gas provider in over 90 deregulated markets across the U.S. XOOM Energy’s family of companies includes: "XOOM Energy California, LLC", "XOOM Energy Connecticut, LLC, "XOOM Energy Delaware, LLC", "XOOM Energy Washington D.C., LLC", "XOOM Energy Georgia, LLC", "XOOM Energy Illinois, LLC", "XOOM Energy Indiana, LLC", "XOOM Energy Kentucky, LLC", "XOOM Energy Maine, LLC", "XOOM Energy Maryland, LLC", "XOOM Energy Massachusetts, LLC", "XOOM Energy Michigan, LLC", "XOOM Energy New Hampshire, LLC", "XOOM Energy New Jersey, LLC", "XOOM Energy New York, LLC", "XOOM Energy Ohio, LLC", "XOOM Energy Pennsylvania, LLC", "XOOM Energy Rhode Island, LLC", "XOOM Energy Texas, LLC", And "XOOM Energy Virginia, LLC" (hereinafter collectively "XOOM Energy") and offers electricity, renewable and/or natural gas products In each of their respective states. We are not affiliated with, nor endorsed by, any local utility or state commission.


And just like with any plan, it’s worth it to do the math to see how different scenarios will affect your bill. Take, for example, a home in Sweetwater that uses about 1,000 kWh of energy per month, and is interested in the Texas Essentials 12 plan. Zero percent renewable energy is the cheapest option — but by committing to a $5 monthly charge for its 100 percent “JustGreen” option, it’s actually cheaper than the 60 percent hybrid renewable option.
If you live in the greater Houston area, there are over 60 different energy suppliers competing for your business. Many of these providers have websites that are confusing and difficult to navigate, their rates buried in misleading advertising and dense jargon. Who has the time to sort through and keep track of options across all these different sites?
×